Rachael Brennan has been working in the insurance industry since 2006 when she began working as a licensed insurance representative for 21st Century Insurance, during which time she earned her Property and Casualty license in all 50 states. After several years she expanded her insurance expertise, earning her license in Health and AD&D insurance as well. She has worked for small health insuran...

Full Bio →

Written by

Chris Harrigan has an economic degree from Limestone College and an MBA from Clemson University. He previously managed auto insurance claims for Enterprise Rent-A-Car. Currently, he is using his business and insurance expertise to provide insurance data analysis and visualizations to enhance the user experience.

Full Bio →

Reviewed by Chris Harrigan
Former Auto Insurance Claims Manager Chris Harrigan

UPDATED: Apr 13, 2022

Advertiser Disclosure

It’s all about you. We want to help you make the right car insurance coverage choices.

Advertiser Disclosure: We strive to help you make confident car insurance decisions. Comparison shopping should be easy. We are not affiliated with any one car insurance company and cannot guarantee quotes from any single company.

Our car insurance industry partnerships don’t influence our content. Our opinions are our own. To compare quotes from many different car insurance companies please enter your ZIP code on this page to use the free quote tool. The more quotes you compare, the more chances to save.

Editorial Guidelines: We are a free online resource for anyone interested in learning more about auto insurance. Our goal is to be an objective, third-party resource for everything auto insurance related. We update our site regularly, and all content is reviewed by auto insurance experts.

Key Takeaways

  • A traffic ticket is a written document from a police officer outlining a traffic violation
  • The length of time a ticket remains on your driving record depends on the nature of your traffic violation and the state you live in
  • Getting a traffic ticket is likely to make your car insurance rates increase

If you were driving and got a traffic ticket, you might be curious to know how long a ticket stays on your record. Laws for traffic tickets vary by state, so the amount of time a ticket remains on your record depends on where you live and the nature of your traffic violation.

Most speeding tickets and traffic violations can add two to six points to your license, and speeding tickets can raise your car insurance rates. These violations can stay on your driving record for anywhere between six months and five years, depending on several factors.

What is a traffic ticket?

A traffic ticket is a written document from a police officer outlining a traffic violation. Most of the time, people receive a traffic ticket when they violate the law while driving, but you may also receive one if you park illegally.

A traffic ticket will often have your violation written on it. The ticket may also have the officer’s name who wrote the ticket, the date and time, and a summons for you to appear in court.

The traffic violation will appear on your driving record. Depending on the nature of your infraction, you could have anywhere from two to six or more points added to your driver’s license.

Compare quotes from the top car insurance companies and save

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How many points does a ticket add to my driver’s license?

The nature of your violation and where you live determine how many points you get on your driver’s license. Some of the most common two-point violations in the U.S. include:

  • Improper lane shifting
  • Dangerous parking
  • Backing in an unsafe manner
  • Speeding up to 10 miles per hour

Similarly, some of the infractions that add four points to a person’s driver’s license in most states include:

  • Improper passing
  • Improper turning
  • Failing to yield the right-of-way
  • Driving in the wrong direction
  • Tailgating
  • Speeding anywhere between 11 to 20 miles per hour

Lastly, the common violations that will add six points on a driver’s license include:

  • Passing a stopped school bus
  • Reckless driving
  • Leaving the scene of a crash with property damage
  • Speeding 21 or more miles per hour

If you do not see your violation listed above, you may want to research and see how many points it will add to your driver’s license in your state. You should direct any questions or concerns to your state’s department of motor vehicles.

How long does a ticket stay on your insurance?

Traffic tickets are not added to your insurance, but they are on your driving record. Often, your insurance company will see the changes in your driving record and begin to charge you higher rates for car insurance coverage.

The length of time a traffic ticket stays on your driving record depends on the nature of your violation, and it also depends on the state you live in. While most states have similar laws and time frames for traffic tickets, they can differ.

How long does a speeding ticket stay on your record in Georgia?

Most speeding infractions remain on your driving record for two years in Georgia. You may find that your speeding ticket stays on your driving record longer if it is associated with something like a DUI, DWI, or a hit and run event in which you were at fault.

Compare quotes from the top car insurance companies and save

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How long does a speeding ticket stay on your record in New Mexico?

The state of New Mexico keeps speeding tickets on a person’s driving record for one year from the date of the violation. Once the year is up, a person’s New Mexico driving record is cleared of the infraction, potentially helping them with their car insurance rates.

How long does a ticket stay on your record in Washington state?

Unlike New Mexico and Georgia, speeding tickets in Washington state can stay on a person’s driving record for up to five years. The length of time varies depending on how fast you were going and whether you requested a deferred finding for your violation.

How long does a speeding ticket stay on your record in Florida?

According to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, a traffic citation can stay on your driving record for up to 10 years. When it comes to alcohol-related traffic infractions, they could stay on your record for as many as 75 years after the date of violation.

Compare quotes from the top car insurance companies and save

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How long does a speeding ticket stay on your record in Tennessee?

Much like Georgia, a speeding ticket in Tennessee can stay on a person’s driving record for up to two years. During that time, it’s possible to lower your insurance rates by completing a safe driving course.

How much is car insurance after a ticket?

After getting a ticket, you can expect your car insurance rates to increase. Your car insurance company will often see that your driving record has changed and immediately increase your car insurance rates since you are considered high risk.

The table below shows the average car insurance rates with major insurance companies based on a person’s driving history.

Average Annual Car Insurance Rates by Driving History
CompanyAverage Annual Rates with Clean RecordAverage Annual Rates with 1 AccidentAverage Annual Rates with 1 DUIAverage Annual Rates with 1 Speeding Violation
Allstate$3,819.90$4,987.68$6,260.73$4,483.51
American Family$2,693.61$3,722.75$4,330.24$3,025.74
Farmers$3,460.60$4,518.73$4,718.75$4,079.01
GEICO$2,145.96$3,192.77$4,875.87$2,645.43
Liberty Mutual$4,774.30$6,204.78$7,613.48$5,701.26
Nationwide$2,746.18$3,396.95$4,543.20$3,113.68
Progressive$3,393.09$4,777.04$3,969.65$4,002.28
State Farm$2,821.18$3,396.01$3,636.80$3,186.01
Travelers$3,447.69$4,289.74$5,741.40$4,260.80
USAA$1,933.68$2,516.24$3,506.03$2,193.25
Get Your Rates Quote Now

Compare RatesStart Now →

If you have a clean driving history or one minor violation, your car insurance rates should not be very high. It’s a good idea to shop around at least once a year to compare car insurance rates from multiple companies to make sure you are not paying too much for coverage.