Rachael Brennan has been working in the insurance industry since 2006 when she began working as a licensed insurance representative for 21st Century Insurance, during which time she earned her Property and Casualty license in all 50 states. After several years she expanded her insurance expertise, earning her license in Health and AD&D insurance as well. She has worked for small health insuran...

Full Bio →

Written by

Chris Harrigan has an economic degree from Limestone College and an MBA from Clemson University. He previously managed auto insurance claims for Enterprise Rent-A-Car. Currently, he is using his business and insurance expertise to provide insurance data analysis and visualizations to enhance the user experience.

Full Bio →

Reviewed by Chris Harrigan
Former Auto Insurance Claims Manager Chris Harrigan

UPDATED: Apr 13, 2022

Advertiser Disclosure

It’s all about you. We want to help you make the right car insurance coverage choices.

Advertiser Disclosure: We strive to help you make confident car insurance decisions. Comparison shopping should be easy. We are not affiliated with any one car insurance company and cannot guarantee quotes from any single company.

Our car insurance industry partnerships don’t influence our content. Our opinions are our own. To compare quotes from many different car insurance companies please enter your ZIP code on this page to use the free quote tool. The more quotes you compare, the more chances to save.

Editorial Guidelines: We are a free online resource for anyone interested in learning more about auto insurance. Our goal is to be an objective, third-party resource for everything auto insurance related. We update our site regularly, and all content is reviewed by auto insurance experts.

Key Takeaways

  • A DUI is not documented on your car insurance, but it is recorded on your driving record, which is likely to impact your car insurance rates
  • The length of time that a DUI infraction remains on your driving record will depend on where you live and whether this is your first or a subsequent offense
  • Auto insurance rates after a DUI offense can increase as much as 80% depending on the situation and your insurance company

If you’ve ever been convicted of a DUI infraction, you may have found that you have many hurdles to overcome in regard to getting back behind the wheel. You may have to pay hefty fines, update your driver’s license, and shop around for a new car insurance company.

One of the questions that many people have when they receive a DUI infraction is how long that conviction will appear on their driving record. But if you’re wondering how long a DUI remains on your driving record, that will depend on where you live and whether it was your first conviction or an ensuing offense.

How long does a DUI stay on your insurance?

A DUI conviction does not actually get recorded on your insurance. Instead, if you are convicted of a DUI infraction, that offense will be documented on your driving record, which is certain to impact your future car insurance rates. A DUI conviction can remain on your record for anywhere from a few months to more than 10 years. This will depend on where you live and whether or not it was your first offense or a subsequent DUI charge.

Because a DUI infraction can impact your car insurance rates — and can force you to even stop driving for a period of time — how you handle your DUI offense is extremely important. There is no DUI insurance trick to help you evade your current insurance company regarding your conviction.

In the same way, if you are considering lying or failing to inform your insurance company about your DUI conciction, you should seriously reconsider. Your insurance company will discover the fact that you were caught driving under the influence, and your best bet is to let them know ahead of time to determine how much your rates will increase and inform them about your side of the story.

Compare quotes from the top car insurance companies and save

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How long does a DUI stay on your background check?

Unfortunately, a DUI infraction will remain on your criminal record for your entire life. While this will not impact factors such as your insurance rates after a certain number of years — because a DUI conviction will be erased from your driving record — if someone performs a background check on you, your DUI offense may be exposed regardless of how long it has been.

Similar to driving records in different states, the duration in which your DUI conviction will be disclosed on your background check will depend on where you reside. For instance, in South Carolina, a DUI infraction will remain on your background check indefinitely. In Florida, however, your DUI conviction will be expunged from any public records after 75 years.

The good news is that a single DUI offense is not very likely to impact any opportunities regarding your career, travel, or the purchase of a home. Instead, DUI infractions are most likely to impact your driving record and your car insurance options.

How much does a DUI cost?

Depending on where you live, your DUI conviction can cost you hundreds, and even thousands, of dollars. The table below reveals the various fines and fees associated with a DUI infraction in each state, based on whether it’s your first offense or an ensuing conviction.

Financial Penalties for DUI by State
StateFirst OffenseSecond OffenseThird and Subsequent Offenses
Alabama$500-$2000 +$100 for Impaired Drivers Trust Fund$1000-$5000 +$100 for Impaired Drivers Trust FundThird - $2,000-$10,000 +$100 for Impaired Drivers Trust Fund
Fourth - $4000-$10,000
Alaska$1500 minimum +$200 license reinstatement fee$3000 minimum +$500 license reinstatement feeThird - $4000 minimum
Fourth - $10,000
Arizona$250 base fine$500 base fine$750 base fine
Arkansas$150-$1000$400-$3000$900-$5000
California$390-$1000$390-$1000$390-$1000
Colorado$600-$1000$600-$1500$600-$1500
Connecticut$500-$1000$1000-$4000$2000-$8000
Delaware$500$750-$2500Third - $1,500 up to $5000
Fourth - up to $7000
Fifth and Sixth- up to $10,000
Seventh - up to $15,000
Florida$500-$1000; High BAC or minor in the car, $1000-$2000$1000-$2000; High BAC or minor in the car, $2000-$4000Third - more than 10 years from second conviction - $2000-$5000; high BAC or minor in the car - $4000 minimum
Fourth - $2000 minimum
Georgia$300-$1000$600-$1000$1000-$5000
Hawaii$150-$1000 +$25 to special fund +$25 to trauma system special fund if court-ordered$500-$1500+$25 to special fund+$50 to trauma system fund if court-ordered; additional $500 if there is a child in the vehicle$500-$2500+$25 to special fund+$50 to trauma system fund if court-ordered; additional $500 if there is a child in the vehicle
Idahono minimum up to $1000no minimum up to $2000no minimum up to $5000
Illinois$500 to $2500$1250 to $2500$2500 up to $25,000
Indiana$500 to $5000no minimum up to $10,000no minimum up to $10,000
Iowa$625-$1250 OR community service$1875-$6250$3125-$9375
Kansas$500-$1000$1000-$1500Third - $1500-$2500
Fourth - $2500
Kentucky$200-$500$350-$500$500-$1000
Louisiana$300-$1000 +$100 reinstatement fee$750-$1000 +$200 reinstatement feeThird - $2000 +$300 reinstatement fee
Fourth - $5000 +$300 reinstatement fee
Maine$500$700 minimumThird - $1100 minimum
Fourth - $2100 minimum
Marylandno minimum to $1000no minimum to $2,000no minimum to $3,000
Massachusetts$500-$5000$600-$10000Third - $1000-$15,000
Fourth - $1500-$25,000
Fifth - $2000-$50,000
Michigan$100-$500$200-$1000 +$1000 driver responsibility fee$500-$5000 +$1000 driver responsibility fee
Minnesota$1,000$3,000Third - $3,000 minimum
Fourth - if within 10 years, $14000
Mississippi$250-$10002nd in 5 years: $600-$15003rd in 5 years: $2000-$5000
Missourino minimumno minimumno minimum
Montana$600-$1000 +$200 reinstatement fee$1200-$2000$2500-$5000
Nebraskano minimum, but up to $500no minimum, but up to $1000Third - no minimum, but up to $1,000
Fourth - up to $10,000
Fifth - up to $25000
Nevada$400-$1000$750-$1000Third in seven years - $2000-$5000
New Hampshire$500 minimum$750 minimumThird - $750 minimum
Fourth - $930 minimum
New JerseyBAC 0.08-0.99: $250-$400; BAC 0.10-0.14: $300-$500; BAC 0.15+: $300-$500; BAC 0.08+ $3505 in fees and surcharges$500-$1000; $3555 in fees and surchargesThird in 10 years of 2nd: $1000 +$5055 in fees and surcharges
New MexicoNo minimum$500-$1000Third - $750-$1000
Fourth - up tp $5000
New York$500-$1000; ADWI: $1000-$2500Second in 10 years: $1000-$5000; ADWI: $1000-$5000Third in 10 years: $2000-$10000; ADWI: $2000-$10000
North CarolinaN/AN/AN/A
North Dakota$500 minimum$600 minimum$2,000 minimum
Ohio$250-$1075; license reinstatement fee $475$350-$1625 +license reinstatement fee of $475$350-$2750 +$475 license reinstatement fee
Oklahomano minimum, but up to $1000no minimum, but up to $2500no minimum, but up to $5000
Oregonminimum $1000 for BAC; minimum $2000 for HBAC; up to $10,000 if child in carminimum $1500; HBAC minimum $2000; up to $10,000 if child in car$2000 minimum, additional $2000 for HBAC
Pennsylvania$300$300-$2500$500-$5000
Rhode Island$100-$500 +$500 to highway assessment fund$400-$800$400-$5000 +$500 to highway assessment fund
South Carolina$400 minimum ($992 with assessments and surcharges)$2100-$5,100 ($10,744.50 with assessments and surcharges)$3800 - $6300 ($13,234.50 with assessments and surcharges)
South Dakota$2000 minimum$2000 minimumThird - $4000
Fourth - $20,000
Tennessee$350-$1500$600-$10,000Third - $1100-$10,000
Fourth - $3000-$15,000
Texasno minimum up to $2000 +conviction based surcharge of $1000 for three consecutive years; if HBAC, the surcharge is $1500 for three consecutive yearsno minimum up to $4000 +conviction based surcharge of $1500 for three consecutive years; HBAC surcharge $2000 for three consecutive yearsno minimum up to $10,000
Utah$1310 minimum$1560 minimum$2,850 up to $5000
Vermontno minimum up to $700no minimum up to $1500no minimum up to $2,500
Virginia$250 mandatory minimum$500 mandatory minimum$1000 mandatory minimum
Washington$865.50-$5000$1195.50-$5000$2045.50-$5000
West Virginia$100-$500$1000-$3000$3000-$5000
Wisconsin$150-$300 +$365 OWI surcharge2nd in 10 years: $350-$1100 +$365 surcharge. 2nd in 11+ years: $150-$300 +$365 surcharge$600-$2000 +$365 OWI surcharge
Wyomingno minimum, but up to $750$250-$750Third - $250-$3000
Fourth - up to $10,000
Washington DCup to $300$1000-$5000$2000-$10000
Get Your Rates Quote Now

Compare RatesStart Now →

As you can see from the table above, a DUI conviction can cost as little as $100 or as much as $25,000. And this number is simply a reflection of the financial penalties from your actual infraction. You will still have to face potentially staggering auto insurance rates as well.

How much is car insurance after a DUI?

After you’ve been convicted of a DUI infraction, you can expect your car insurance rates to increase significantly. Most estimates state that car insurance rates for people with a first offense can increase as much as 80%. This is especially true if you choose to remain with the same insurance company.

If you have received a DUI conviction, it’s a good idea to let your insurance company know about it and determine how this might impact your auto insurance rates. Based on your driving record, there’s a slight chance that you may lose your car insurance coverage altogether.

Your state may require that you file an SR-22 once your DUI conviction is official. If you do, you should check with your insurance company to discern whether this will impact your coverage. There are many companies that will still offer you SR-22 car insurance coverage, but these companies may only be willing to provide you with liability insurance.

Compare quotes from the top car insurance companies and save

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I find cheap car insurance after a DUI?

Insurance coverage after a DUI conviction will probably never be inexpensive. But you can certainly do a few things to ensure that you find the most affordable coverage possible following your DUI offense.

First, you can speak with your insurance company and determine how much your rates will increase. Find out if you can lower your coverage amount or increase your deductible to offset the cost of your monthly rates. You can also inquire as to whether or not you are eligible for any discounts on auto insurance coverage.

If your insurance company does not help you lower your car insurance rates, you should shop around for coverage from other companies. Be sure to compare quotes from several different insurance companies to discover which one offers the best deal following a DUI infraction.